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Africa and the 2020 US Elections

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Africa and the 2020 US Elections

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n August 2020, the African Centre for the Study of the United States (ACSUS) based at the University of the Witwatersrand launched a weekly webinar series on the meaning of the 2020 US elections for Africa. Speakers were encouraged to condense some of their thoughts into the articles published in this series. The initial objective was to help African audience understand, appreciate and debate the significance of the outcome of the elections on the economic, political, and cultural interests of Africa as a continent, its regions, countries and people. After the elections on November 3, and with Joe Biden declared the winner, focus turned toward the development of an African policy framework towards the US.

The series is a partnership of the African Centre for the Study of the United States at the University of the Witwatersrand and the Africa Portal, a project of the South African Institute of International Affairs (SAIIA). It is ongoing: contributors are welcome to submit articles of up to 3,000 words on any aspect of Africa-US policy, with an emphasis on pragmatic African agency. Topics may include foreign policy, climate, human rights & democracy, race relations & diaspora, trade & economics, defence & security, youth and gender issues, geopolitics, etc. Please email Bob Wekesa, Research, Partnership & Communications Coordinator at ACSUS, if you are interested in contributing: [email protected].

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(Main image: Mark Makela/Getty Images)