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Africa Initiative Graduate Research Grant Recipients

The Africa Initiative Graduate Research Grant (AIGRG) supported Africa- and Canada-based graduate students undertaking policy-related research on Africa. The 2012 round of grants included 20 students – 10 based at African universities and another 10 based at Canadian institutions. The AIGRG has built capacity by providing grantees with an opportunity to conduct new and innovative research and publish work in their field of expertise, and in alignment with the Africa Initiative's critical issue areas.

As of December 2013, the Exchange Program has concluded; no further calls for applications will be issued. See the Africa Initiative site for information about its new programming.

2012 Africa Initiative Graduate Research Grant Recipients

  • Brandon Currie
    Masters Student, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Ghana
    Country of Research: Ghana
    Research: Forest resource management and poverty alleviation in Ghana's forest-fringe communities

    James Boafo is a Master's student in geography and rural development at the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology in Ghana. He is currently working on project relating to sustainable forest management and poverty alleviation, with the aim to explore linkages between the two fields. His research interests include forest management, poverty alleviation, climate change and food security.

    Publications

  • PhD Student, University of Ottawa, Canada
    Country of Research: Ghana
    Research: Sustainable frameworks for the trans-boundary movement and management of electronic wastes

    Gideon Emcee Christian is a Ph.D. student and a part-time professor in environmental law at the University of Ottawa, Canada. His doctoral research focuses on development of a sustainable framework for trans-boundary movement and management of electronic wastes. He obtained his LL.B. from the University of Lagos in 2002 and a LL.M. from the University of Ottawa in 2007. He has won various academic awards including the International Development Research Center (IDRC) Internship Research Award, IDRC Doctoral Award, Joseph Armand Bombardier Award and the University of Ottawa Excellence Award.

  • PhD Student, Queen’s University, Canada
    Country of Research: Gabon
    Research: The political economy of extractive energy in Africa

    W. R. Nadège Compaoré is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Political Studies at Queen’s University. Her research interests include international political economy, international security, corporate social responsibility and global governance, while her doctoral research investigates the political economy of extractive energy in Gabon and Ghana. A student from Burkina Faso, she earned a B.A. in international political economy from Trent University, and a M.A. in political studies from Queen’s University.

  • PhD Student, University of Western Ontario, Canada
    Country of Research: Zimbabwe
    Research: Understanding the sender-receiver relationship in migrant decision-making in Francistown

    Riley Dillon is a Ph.D. candidate in the Migration and Ethnic Relations Program within the Department of Geography at the University of Western Ontario. She completed her Master’s in development studies at the University of Botswana, and her current research employs geographic theories of gender, migration and development to understand how social and cultural forces shape migrant remittances. She has previously conducted research on Canadian immigration with the Welcoming Communities Initiative and the Central-South Etobicoke Local Immigration Partnership.

  • PhD Student, University of Ottawa, Canada
    Country of Research: Kenya
    Research: Source country perspectives on the migration of health professionals in Kenya

    Brenda Dogbey is a Ph.D. candidate at the Institute of Population Health at University of Ottawa. Her current areas of research interest include global health policy, health system strengthening, systems thinking, gender perspectives and migration. Brenda has been involved in a number of collaborative research projects including the Mobility of Health Professionals study coordinated by the International Organization for Migration. She holds a M.Sc. in population and public health from Simon Fraser University and a B.A. in women’s studies and political science from the University of British Columbia.

  • Brandon Currie
    PhD Student, University of British Columbia, Canada
    Country of Research: South Africa
    Research: Emerging farmers using renewable energy for agricultural productivity in South Africa

    Kieran Findlater is a Ph.D. candidate and the Killam Doctoral Scholar at the Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability at the University of British Columbia (UBC). His current research interests involve interdisciplinary inquiry in renewable energy technology, energy access, energy policy, rural development, agricultural productivity and adaptation to climate change. Kieran earned his M.Sc. from UBC in 2009, and completed his B.Sc. at the University of Alberta in 2005.

  • Brandon Currie
    PhD Student, University of Stellenbosch, South Africa
    Research: Development of a complex evaluation framework for food security interventions

    Leanne Idzedra is pursuing her Ph.D. at the University of Stellenbosch in South Africa, where her research is focused on developing methodologies to assess the impact of food security programs. She has also worked at the Centre for Global Health Research at the University of Ottawa and at the Canadian Red Cross on a variety of projects revolving around professionalizing humanitarian assistance, developing methodologies for assessing equity, and improving population health.

  • Brandon Currie
    PhD Student, University of Witwatersrand, South Africa
    Country of Research: Kenya
    Research: Citizenship, identity and ethnic integration: IDP's quest for durable solutions in Kenya

    Prisca Kamungi is a Ph.D. candidate at the African Centre for Migration and Society at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa. Her research interests include political violence, refugees and internally displaced persons, and conflict management in Eastern Africa and the Great Lakes region.

    Publications

  • Brandon Currie
    PhD Student, University of Cape Town
    Country of Research: Namibia
    Research: The role of women in urban food security in the informal settlements of Windhoek, Namibia

    Ndeyapo Martha Nickanor is a doctoral candidate at the University of Cape Town’s Department of Environmental and Geographical Science, researching issues of urban food (in)security, strategies for survival, and resiliency to food insecurity among Southern African women. Ndeyapo also lectures in the department of statistics at the University of Namibia, where she teaches courses on population and development at the undergraduate and graduate levels.

    Publications

  • PhD Student, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa
    Country of Research: Malawi
    Research: Circular labour migration netweorks and HIV/AIDS in Malawi

    Wilfred Masebo is a Ph.D. student in development studies at the University of KwaZulu-Natal in Durban, where he is studying labour migration networks and HIV in Malawi. Wilfred holds an M.A. in labour, policies and globalisation from the Berlin School of Economics and Law, and previously served as head of programmes and research for the Teachers Union of Malawi. Most recently, Wilfred worked as a research and training coordinator at the Centre for Human Rights and Rehabilitation in Malawi.

    Publications

  • Masters Student, International Health Sciences University, Uganda
    Country of Research: Uganda
    Research: Factors affecting health system preparedness and response to climate change in Uganda

    Didacus Bambaiha Namanya is an M.Ph. student at International Health Sciences University, Uganda. He has worked as a geographer at the Ministry of Health in Uganda for the past 11 years, where his work involves public health mapping and policy development. His current research interests focuses on climate change, health systems and indigenous communities. He will be hosted as a visiting scholar in Canada at McGill University’s Department of Geography.

    Publications

  • Brandon Currie
    PhD Student, Mbarara University of Science and Technology, Uganda
    Country of Research: Uganda
    Research: Household social determinants of demand for maternal health services in Uganda

    Viola Nyakato is pursuing her Ph.D. in Development Studies at Mbarara University of Science and Technology (MUST), Uganda. With a passion for women’s empowerment and inclusiveness, Viola’s Ph.D. research investigates the effect of intra-household power relations on women’s maternal health. Her education includes a Bachelor’s degree from Makerere University, Uganda, and a Master’s in public health from Lund University, Sweden.

  • Brandon Currie
    PhD Student, University of Western Ontario, Canada
    Country of Research: Ghana
    Research: Food security and smallholder farmer adaptation to climate change in Ghana's Upper-West Region

    Hanson Nyantakyi-Frimpong is a Ph.D. candidate in geography and international development at the University of Western Ontario. His research interests focus on development geography and human-environment interactions, rural livelihood security, global environmental and economic change and tropical agricultural systems. His doctoral dissertation applies a political ecology lens to food security and climate change adaptation in Ghana. He holds a Bachelor’s degree in development planning from Kwame Nkrumah University and a Master’s in community and environmental planning from the University of Montana.

  • Masters Student, University of Cape Town, South Africa
    Research: Investigating changes in hydro-climate over the Nile basin area using a regional climate model

    At the time of his participation in the Graduate Research Grant Program, Claude-Michel was a Master's candidate in the Department of Environmental and Geographical Science at University of Cape Town, South Africa. With a background in mathematical sciences, his research focusses on the use of atmospheric models to study air pollution and climate at the regional scale.

  • PhD Student, University of Alberta, Canada
    Country of Research: Ghana
    Research: The Political Economy of Ghana-China Relations on Energy and Development

    Isaac Odoom is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Political Science at the University of Alberta. His research interests include African international relations, Africa-China development projects, and critical international relations and development theory. Specifically, his Ph.D. dissertation examines Ghana-China relations on energy and development. He holds an M.A. degree in political science from Brock University and a B.A. in political science from the University of Ghana

  • Brandon Currie
    PhD Student, Covenant University, Nigeria
    Country of Research: Nigeria
    Research: The human rights dimension of Diaspora and sub-regional integration in West Africa: A case study of Nigeria-Ghana relations

    Fayomi Oluyemi is a lecturer at Covenant University, Nigeria, in the Department of Political Science and International Relations. Her research interests include migration, regional integration, Diaspora and gender.

  • Masters Student, University of Nairobi
    Country of Research: Kenya
    Research: Water governance and climate change adaptation in informal settlements in Huruma, Kenya

    Stephen Otieno is an M.A candidate in the Department of Environmental Planning and Management at the University of Nairobi in Kenya. His research examines water governance and climate change adaptation strategies in informal settlements, and is an outgrowth his involvement with an IDRC/DFID-funded project on strengthening the role of civil society in water governance and climate change adaptation in African cities.

    Publications

  • Brandon Currie
    PhD Student, University of British Columbia, Canada
    Country of Research: Ethiopia
    Research: Africa in global climate change negotiations, 1992-2012

    Charles Roger is a Ph.D. student at the University of British Columbia (UBC). His research focuses on transnational governance, global environmental politics, and international political economy. He holds a B.A. from Concordia University, in Montreal, and an M.Sc. from the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). Prior to his studies at UBC, Charles worked as a researcher at LSE and as a consultant to the United Nations on climate change and energy governance issues in developing states.

  • Brandon Currie
    PhD Student, University of Ottawa, Canada
    Research: Securing the Sahel: Governing the Ungoverned

    Adam Sandor is a doctoral candidate in the School of Political Studies at the University of Ottawa. He has a Master's degree from the University of Wales-Aberystwyth in citizenship and security (European and global dimensions), for which he was awarded the Marie Curie Fellowship. His current doctoral research examines global efforts at producing forms of security governance through the development of local expertise and authority in West Africa, with a specific concentration on the Sahel.

    Publications

  • Brandon Currie
    PhD Student, University of British Columbia, Canada
    Country of Research: Uganda
    Research: Relationships between international criminal tribunals and victims of mass violence

    Chris Tenove is a doctoral candidate in political science at the University of British Columbia. Previously, he has been a scholar with the Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation and a visiting researcher at the University of California, Berkeley. His research brings together international relations and democratic theory to explore the democratic possibilities of global governance institutions, while his doctoral dissertation focuses on the relationships between international criminal tribunals and victims of mass violence. Chris Tenove previously worked as a journalist, contributing to Maclean’s, The Walrus, The Globe and Mail, The Tyee, CBC Radio, and the Radio Netherlands World Service.

2011 Africa Initiative Graduate Research Grant Recipients

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    PhD Student, University of Ibadan, Nigeria
    Research: Cross-border networking and identity integration within the ECOWAS framework

    Adebusuyi I. Adeniran is a doctoral student at the Department of Sociology at the University of Ibadan, Nigeria and a lecturer at the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Obafemi Awolowo University, Nigeria. His research focuses on the interplay of cross–border networking and identity integration in West Africa. He has published widely in notable local and international journals, periodicals, books, and encyclopedias. He is a recipient of cogent scholarship, fellowship and awards. He is a member of several professional organizations, such as The Utopian Studies Society and The Migration and Development in Africa Monitors (MDAM). He is presently on the editorial board of Wiley-Blackwell’s Working USA: The Journal of Labor and Society. Adeniran is hosted as a visiting scholar by the Harriet Tubman Institute for Research on the Global Migrations of African Peoples at York University in Toronto. 
     

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    PhD Student, McGill University, Canada
    Research: An ethnography of social complexity, food security and drought in Maasai areas (Kenya)

    Julia Bailey is a PhD candidate in socio-cultural anthropology at McGill University. She commenced her fieldwork in September, 2011 in two Maasai communities located in southern Kenya where she is examining the impact of Maasai women's social networks on pastoral livelihood strategies at the household level. An important dimension of this research considers how such networks are used in order to manage household food security. Julia holds a Master of Arts degree in social anthropology from the London School of Economics and Political Science, and a Bachelor of Arts (honours) degree in international development studies from McGill University. 
     

    Publications

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    Masters Student, McGill University, Canada
    Research: The effect of a caregiver microcredit-nutrition education intervention on child feeding behaviours in Ghana

    Katherine Birks is a Master’s thesis candidate in the department of Dietetics and Human Nutrition at McGill University. With a background in physiology and international development studies, her Master’s thesis focuses on child nutrition in a development context. More specifically, the research examines the determinants of feeding frequency among infants and young children in Ghana as well as barriers and facilitators to behaviour change among caregivers. 

    Publications

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    PhD Student, University of Victoria, Canada
    Research: Climate change vulnerability, adaptation, and community resiliency in coastal Mozambique

    After earning a Bachelor of Science (honours) degree in biology from the Memorial University of Newfoundland, Jessica moved to Malawi to study small-scale tilapia farming and the social dimensions of fish farming.  Upon returning to Canada, she began her Master of Arts program at York University in geography.  After returning to Malawi Jessica studied the relationship between farmers and their environment. Currently, she is a PhD candidate at the University of Victoria and works at the intersection between social and ecological geography. Her primary research focuses on resilience in coastal Mozambique and on how communities adapt to change. Specifically, she is interested in the risks experience by fishing communities, coping mechanisms, and community-based adaptations to lessen vulnerability and enhance resilience in rural fishing communities. 
     

  • PhD Student, University of Ghana. Ghana
    Research: Discontent and aggressive political participation in Ghana

    George M. Bob-Milliar is a PhD candidate at the Institute of African Studies, University of Ghana. He received his undergraduate degree from the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana. His article, ‘Chieftaincy, Diaspora,  and  Development: the  Institution  of  Nkɔsuohene  in  Ghana’,  published in African Affairs won the prestigious African Author Prize for excellence in African scholarship by an author in an African institution. He has also published articles in the African Review of Economics & Finance, in Africa: Journal of the International African Institute, in Democratization, and most recently in the Urban Anthropology and Studies of Cultural Systems and World Economic Development. George is hosted as a visiting scholar by the School of International Development and Global Studies at the University of Ottawa. 
     

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    Masters Student, St. Mary's University, Canada
    Research: Large-scale land acquisitions in Madagascar and the impacts on smallholder farmers’ food insecurity

    Ashley Clayton is a Master of Arts student in International Development Studies at St. Mary’s University. in 2011 Ashley conducted fieldwork in Madagascar where she focused on large-scale, foreign-financed agricultural projects and the socioeconomic impacts on smallholder farmers in two rural villages. Her research was carried out in collaboration with the Initiatives in Critical Agrarian Studies, International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Hague. In November 2011, she presented a working paper that she co-authored entitled, “Foreign and Local Elite-Led Land Acquisitions in Madagascar,” at the International Conference on Land Policies in East Africa, hosted by Makerere University, Uganda.  Ashley is in the process of completing her Master’s thesis, which falls under the theme of rural and agrarian development. She holds a Bachelors of Arts (honours) degree in history, and peace and conflict studies from McMaster University. 
     

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    PhD Student, McGill University, Canada
    Research: The political determinants of HIV/AIDS policies in South Africa

    Mark is a doctoral student at the Institute for Health and Social Policy and comes to an interest in global health policy from a background in computer programming and political theory. His current research focuses on comparative HIV/AIDS policies, automated content analysis of the media, and the role of leadership in shaping health policies. 
     

    Publications

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    Masters Student, University of Pretoria, South Africa
    Research: Protonation sequence of the anti-cancer bisphosphonate, zoledronic acid

    Jurgens de Lange is a masters student in theoretical chemistry at the University of Pretoria, South Africa, under the supervision of Prof. Ignacy Cukrowski. Currently he is collaborating with Prof. Gilles Peslherbe at Concordia University in Montreal, investigating computationally the structure and reactivity of bisphosphonates, a class of drugs involved in the diagnosis and treatment of bone-cancer and related diseases. 

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    PhD Student, University of Western Ontario, Canada
    Research: Gender-based analysis of access and use of the Ghana national health insurance scheme

    Jenna Dixon is a PhD candidate in the Department of Geography at the University of Western Ontario, in London, Ontario. She holds a Masters of Arts from the Department of Sociology at the University of Western Ontario. Jenna’s doctoral research draws on a foundation of health geography and developmental geography in order to focus on barriers to health insurance enrolment in Ghana. Specifically, this work analyzes the roles of gender and poverty in achieving access to health care. Jenna has previously studied health care organization in the Canadian context, and has spent time working in health facilities in Kenya and Uganda. 
     

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    Masters Student, Carleton University, Canada
    Research: Exploring professional standards and ethics of international media in conflict-affected societies

    Wairimu joined the media industry in Kenya at 21, and for nearly 10 years have garnered experience working on political shows as a producer and reporter. Wairimu has worked with CNN in 2007 covering the Kenyan election and with Al-Jazeera during the 2010 Kenya constitutional referendum. Her wide ranging interests include media and ethics – especially in Kenya – and exploring methods on how best to address gender issues and transcend barriers of race, ethnicity, and sexual orientation. Wairimu is currently completing Carleton University’s Master’s program at the School of Journalism and Communication. 
     

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    PhD Student, National University of Rwanda, Rwanda
    Research: A comparative study of sexual health and contraception use in Canadian and Rwandan adolescents

    Massudi Hakizamungu is the research, monitoring and evaluation manager for Partners in Health (Rwanda) and a PhD candidate in public health at the National University of Rwanda. His research focuses on reproductive and sexual health, particularly amongst young people. Massudi is hosted as a visiting scholar by the School of Population and Public Health at the University of British Columbia. 
     

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    PhD Student, University of Guelph, Canada
    Research: Indigenous resiliency to climate change and mitigation impacts on waterborne disease (Uganda)

    Sherilee Harper is a PhD student in epidemiology and a Vanier Canada Graduate Scholar (CIHR) at the University of Guelph. Her current areas of research interest include ecohealth, public health, Indigenous health, climate change, waterborne-disease, and capacity development. Her interest in these research areas stem from her undergraduate and graduate experiences. During her Bachelor of Science degree in biology, she had different opportunities to work on conservation biology research projects as a field and laboratory assistant, and participated in field courses in Kenya, Mexico, and Iceland. While she enjoyed the hands-on aspect of field research, she was also interested in human health issues related to the ecological research she was involved in. These opportunities sparked her interest in complex interrelationships of human health and the environment and led a Master of Science program in epidemiology. Currently, her PhD research investigates relationships between climate change, water security, and Indigenous health in Canadian Inuit and Ugandan Batwa. 

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    PhD Student, University of Western Ontario, Canada
    Research: Exposure to pesticides and its impact on the health of residents from floriculture communities in Kenya

    Phaedra Henley (BMSc, MES) is a PhD student in the Ecosystem Health program in the Department of Pathology, Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry at the University of Western Ontario (UWO). She graduated in 2009 from the UWO Master's program in Environment and Sustainability and has an undergraduate degree in Medical Sciences. She has studied Ecosystem Health in many settings including on Salt Spring Island, BC and is involved in ongoing Ecosystem Health research with two Canadian First Nations. She recently completed an assignment in Kenya, working on a collaborative community-based interdisciplinary project with researchers from Egerton University and UWO to study the impacts of the changing environment of Lake Naivasha on the health of its residents. 
     

    Publications

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    PhD Student, Obafemi Awolowo University, Nigeria
    Research: Patterns and processes of irregular migration among Nigerian youth

    Lanre Olusegun Ikuteyijo is a lecturer and a PhD candidate in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria. His research interests include migration, criminal justice system, urbanisation and social research methods. Lanre has authored a number of articles on community policing, migration and prison philosophies in reputable journals. He is hosted as a visiting scholar McMaster University’s Department of History. 
     

    Publications

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    PhD Student, University of British Columbia, Canada
    Research: Social suffering and the sexual health of youth-headed households (Kenya)

    Laura Lee is a PhD student in Interdisciplinary Studies based at the Liu Institute for Global Issues at the University of British Columbia. Her research maintains an interdisciplinary approach, including perspectives of public health, social medicine, anthropology and gender with a focus on marginalized children and youth. Her current work focuses on youth sexual health in Kenya’s Rift Valley Province in communities impacted by conflict and HIV. Laura's research interests also include health and social inequities, social suffering and health, resilience, psychosocial well-being of young people, creative and participatory research methodologies, and community-based approaches to research. Laura has worked as a researcher and community health practitioner in Kenya, Rwanda, Angola, Tanzania, India, and Bolivia. She holds a Master of Science degree in International Health from Queen Margaret University (Edinburgh, 2006) and a Bachelor of Science degree (honours) in Physiology from the University of Western Ontario (2004). She is a Liu Scholar at the Liu Institute for Global Issues where she co-founded and coordinated the Transitional Justice Network (2009-11). 
     

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    PhD Student, University of Pretoria, South Africa
    Research: Functional characterization of secondary cell wall proteins

    Ritesh Mewalal is a PhD student in the Department of Genetics at the University of Pretoria, South Africa.  His research focus lies within the proteomic level of Eucalyptus wood formation and how this dynamical level affects the three-dimensional ultra-structure of the secondary cell wall, i.e. wood.  Understanding wood formation is important since biofuels; in particular cellulosic ethanol, is an attractive alternative to the rapidly depleting fossil fuels and Eucalyptus wood is rich in cellulose. Ritesh holds a Master’s of Science degree in genetics and a Bachelor of Science (Honours) in biochemistry. He is hosted as a visiting scholar by the Forest Sciences Centre at the University of British Columbia. 
     

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    PhD Student, Queen's University, Canada
    Research: Rethinking the migration-conflict nexus: Insights from the cocoa regions in Côte d’Ivoire and Ghana

    Matthew I. Mitchell is a PhD candidate in the Department of Political Studies at Queen’s University, Canada. His doctoral research examines the relationship between migration and violent conflict in the cocoa regions in Côte d’Ivoire and Ghana. He is also currently working on a co-authored book manuscript that examines governance strategies in mining sectors that is under contract with the University of British Columbia Press. He holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Saskatchewan and a Master of Arts degree from Université Laval, both in International Studies. 

    Publications

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    PhD Student, Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia
    Research: Socio-economic determinants in sustainable land management

    Mehretu Mulu is a PhD candidate specializing in environmental and development issues at the Institute of Development Studies, Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia and a graduate fellow at the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) under the Nile Basin Development Challenge (NBDC) program of the International Water Management Institute (IWMI). He is a lecturer at Ambo University, Ethiopia. His research focuses on socio-economic determinants of sustainable land and water management with specific focus on the Blue Nile (Abay) basin of Ethiopia. His research interest include sustainable land management, food security and poverty, climate change, and natural resources governance. Mehretu is hosted as a visiting scholar by the School of Environment Enterprise and Development at the University of Waterloo. 
     

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    PhD Student, University of Ibadan, Nigeria
    Research: Determinants of climate change adaptation by smallholder farmers in Niger State, Nigeria

    John Chiwuzulum Odozi is a PhD candidate in the Department of Agricultural Economics at the University of Ibadan, Nigeria and Junior Research Fellow at the French Institute for Research in Africa (IFRA). His research is investigating the economic impact of climate change and determinants of farmers’adaptation behaviour in Niger State, Nigeria. John is hosted as a visiting scholar in the Department of Natural Resource Sciences at McGill University in Montreal, Canada. 
     

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    PhD Student, University of Lagos, Nigeria
    Research: Diplomacy, media and language in conflict management

    Patricia Enimien Ofili is a doctoral candidate in the Department of English at the University of Lagos, Nigeria. Patricia studied English at Bendel State University (now Ambrose Alli University) in 1984 and graduated with a BA (Honors) in 1988. Between 1997 and 1999, she obtained the Master of Public Administration (MPA) degree from Lagos State University, Nigeria. Patricia began her postgraduate studies in English at the University of Lagos in September 2007 and obtained a Master of Arts degree in English (Language) in 2008; entering the university’s PhD program in English in September 2010. Her research investigates the discourse dimensions of language and communication strategies of political statements and media reports on elections and the implications of these on conflict management, focusing specifically on the 2011 post - election crisis in parts of Nigeria. Her research interests include discourse analysis, pragmatics and stylistics. Patricia is hosted as a visiting scholar at the University of Waterloo’s English Department. 

    Publications

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    PhD Student, University of KwaZulu Natal, South Africa
    Research: Strengthening development agro-landscapes against climate change in Tanzania

    Mercy Ojoyi is a doctoral student at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, Pietermaritzburg, South Africa. She specializes in food security under climate change, climate modeling and landscape system analysis, and works with experts and communities in scenario development of resilient systems. She is a visiting research scholar at the University of Guelph working with Professor Evan Fraser, a food security specialist and the Canadian Research Chair in Global Human Security. Mercy’s current research focuses on strengthening development of resilient and productive agro-landscapes to climate change in East Africa. 
     

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    PhD Student, McGill University, Canada
    Research: Payments for ecosystem services and implication for poverty reduction among pastoral communities (Kenya)

    Philip Osano is a PhD candidate in Geography at McGill University, specializing in payments for ecosystem services among pastoralists in drylands ecosystems in Africa. A Sauvé Scholar at McGill in 2006-2007, he holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Environmental Science from Egerton University, Kenya (2002), and a Master of Science degree in Conservation Biology from the University of Cape Town, South Africa (2005). Prior to his PhD studies, Philip managed a 21-country Africa-wide project at BirdLife International African Partnership Secretariat to promote the use of renewable natural resources through increased participation of local communities in biodiversity policies and implementation of environmental agreements. Philip is the co-editor of Young People, Education and Sustainable Development: Exploring the Principles, Perspectives and Praxis (WAP 2009) and was selected as one of 13 Emerging Leaders of the Global Environmental Governance Project. 
     

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    PhD Student, Makerere University, Uganda
    Research: Traditional knowledge and food security amongst the Iteso of Pallisa, Uganda

    Norah Owaraga is a PhD candidate at the Department of Sociology, Faculty of Social Sciences, Makerere University in Kampala, Uganda. Norah’s research areas of interests include social institutions, culture, food security, food studies, African knowledge systems and the Iteso of Uganda. Norah is currently researching the dynamics of beliefs, practices, and food security amongst the Iteso of Pallisa in eastern Uganda. She holds a Master’s of Science degree in Development Management from Open University, United Kingdom; and a Bachelor of Arts degree in Communication Studies from Queen Margaret College University, Edinburgh, Scotland. Norah is a fellow of the African Leadership Initiative East Africa (ALI EA) and a member of the Aspen Global Leadership Network (AGLN). She is hosted as a visiting scholar by the College of Social and Applied Human Sciences at the University of Guelph. 
     

    Publications

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    PhD Student, University of Toronto, Canada
    Research: Profiling defaulters from antiretroviral therapy and improving effectiveness of patient tracing measures (Malawi)

    Beth Rachlisis a PhD candidate, Division of Epidemiology at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health at the University of Toronto. She holds a Master’s degree in Epidemiology from the University of British Columbia where she examined risk behaviours associated with injection drug use. Her doctoral research is carried out in collaboration with Dignitas and her research interests include global health, access to health services, and HIV/AIDS. Beth’s affiliations and activities include:Chair, Graduate Student Alliance for Global Health; Fellow, Collaborative Doctoral Program in Global Health; and Lead, Make World Change, a lecture series with undergraduate students from across University of Toronto, discussing urgent global challenges including health inequity, human rights, education, and conflict. 

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    PhD Student, University of British Columbia, Canada
    Research: Quantifying integration of HIV-related services in primary health care clinics in Free State, South Africa

    Angeli Rawat is a PhD student in the Global Health Research Program at the School of Population and Public Health at the University of British Columbia. Her research focuses on the impact of integrating antiretroviral therapy and related HIV services into public sector primary care clinics in South Africa. She is particularly interested in equitable access to public sector health services for populations in low and middle income countries and health system strengthening. She is also interested in the impacts of globalization on health, increasing pharmaceutical access, community-based research, war and public health and the global health workforce shortage. In addition to being a Liu Scholar she is the current coordinator of a group at UBC called United for Global Health (http://unitedforglobalhealth.weebly.com/index.html). 
     

    Publications

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    PhD Student, University of Calgary, Canada
    Research: The role of customary institutions in land conflict resolution in Ghana

    Rita Esinu Sewornu is a Ghanaian researcher and a PhD student at the University of Calgary’s Interdisciplinary Graduate Program. Rita holds a Master of Science degree in land management and land tenure and a Bachelor of Science degree in land economy from Technical University of Munich, Germany and Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Ghana respectively. Her research interests include customary land tenure, land governance, land law and land policy, land dispute resolutions, cadastral systems and women’s land rights. 
     

    Publications

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    PhD Student, University of Toronto, Canada
    Research: Reconciliation and domestic responses to the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda

    Izabela Steflja is a PhD candidate in the Department of Political Science at the University of Toronto. She holds a Master of Arts degree from the Department of Political Science at McGill University. Her research interests include comparative politics with a particular focus on politics of identity, ethnic conflict and civil war, and transitional justice. Her work has been published in Global Change, Peace, and Security. Izabela’s dissertation examinesthe meaning of international criminal tribunals in different domestic contexts. She has conducted fieldwork in Bosnia and Serbia. Currently, she is researching the domestic response to the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda and its attempt to promote social and political regeneration and reconciliation. 
     

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    Masters Student, Stellenbosch University, South Africa
    Research: Intercultural competence among South African expatriates working and living in Egypt

    Milandré van Wyk is a Master of Arts student in Sociology at the University of Stellenbosch, South Africa. Born in Cape Town she received her Bachelor of Arts degree in sociology, political science and French from the University of Stellenbosch. She completed an internship at Consultancy Africa Intelligence on Gender Issues and worked as a researcher at the Southern African Development Community (SADC) research centre in Cape Town. Academically, Milandré is interested in migration, religious studies, culture, language and development. She is currently hosted as a visiting scholar at the University of British Columbia’s Department of Sociology. 
     

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    Masters Student, St. Mary's University, Canada
    Research: Women's experiences in maternal health care with low utilization of skilled attendants (Uganda)

    Ashley Wallace is a Master of Arts student in International Development Studies at St. Mary's University. Ashley's area of interest is focused on maternal health in developing countries, specifically East Africa. Her current studies have taken her to Uganda where she is researching women's experiences and perceptions of maternal health services in government health facilities. 

     

  • Dr. Akindes was (still is) an Associate Professor in the Department of Politics, Philosophy and Law the University of Wisconsin-Parkside in the USA where he taught courses in Comparative Politics, Democracy and Democratization in Africa, Identity and Politics, Music, Politics and Human Rights, International Studies and Politics of Developing Countries. His multidisciplinary background—political science, international affairs, literature and education— has allowed him to develop a uniquely blended research agenda. He has published educational books, academic articles, book chapters, essays and made numerous presentations on electoral politics in African Côte d’Ivoire, democracy and democratization in Africa, politics and popular culture especially music, identity politics, knowledge, technology and society, and sports in Africa.

    Dr. Akindes’ recent academic interests focus on the politics of Identity, Citizenship and Conflicts in Africa, on comparative studies between the Left in Latin America and Africa, on connections between Afro-Cuban culture and music and Africa, and on the role of popular culture in the process of peace-building.